Archive for January, 2007

Quick Update

January 21, 2007

For those of you who occasionally check in to see what’s going on in my wonderful world of languages, I wanted to give a short update.   I have been dealing with alot of things (mostly grief issues, as the first “anniversary” of my beloved Chris’s death is next week 1/28), and have not had as much time to blog.

However, I am continuing with my Spanish in full force, and dabbling with German.  Adding a little of everything else was way too much for me, and I think I was manic when I wrote my previous “goals for 2007” speech a few weeks ago!  I picked a more reasonable book to read – Diana Gabaldon’s “Outlander” (or “Forastera” in Spanish), and am working through it as my study time permits.  There are tons of vocabulary that I can understand because of the context (and knowing the storyline), which I am adding to my to-learn list.  I am finding that I have a huge passive vocabulary, and I am working towards transferring much of that to my active vocabulary.

I am also dabbling a little bit with German, with the intention of that being my secondary language.  I find that I don’t have that much time for it, and so it gets left by the wayside.  I usually put one lesson of German in with my Spanish (3-s, 1-G)  on my mp3 player for the time when I’m at work, so I still am getting a taste for it, but it’s not a priority in any way.

I’ve also gotten in the habit of watching Stargate SG-1 in Spanish.  It’s one of my favorite TV shows, and when I want to escape or relax, I usually will put those DVDs on before anything else.  The only problem is that only the first season has a Spanish language track, so I will have to break out some other DVDs soon!  The more I watch it in Spanish, the more I understand.

Language Weekends

January 5, 2007

I was contemplating how much I could get done in the span of a weekend, with no distractions and a lot of hard study. If I spent Friday after work until Sunday evening with no obligations other than improving my target language, I feel like I could get alot accomplished.

I was thinking about this, largely in response to listening to German Pimsleur lessons at work today. (I work in a factory, and I have a lot of time where my hands are working but my mind is free – which is why I often have time to listen/think at work.) I took a year of German when I was in high school (12 or 13 years ago), and although I remember a few things, most of it is gone. I think I would be able to pick it up very easily if I had the time to spend on it – alot of the vocabulary and basic grammar is somewhere in the back of my head, and it’s just a matter of getting back into it. If I had a weekend that I could completely devote to it, I think I would be beginner-intermediate level very quickly.

I think I might be able to get rid of my kids next weekend. (I use that term lovingly – my babysitter would love to keep them over the weekend, and the kids would have a lot of fun, too.) I may decide to try it out. If I make 20-30 hours of hard study throughout the weekend, I could get a lot accomplished.

If this works as well as I think it could, I might make a habit of doing it once a month (if my babysitter is willing, anyways!), and change up the language each time. It would also be a good way to get better acquainted with Lithuanian, and get alot further with Spanish. Has anyone tried anything like this, kind of a mini-immersion program with self-teaching? I’d be curious to see what kind of results others would have with a similar plan, and how specifically you would go about doing something like this.

The Eye of the World

January 2, 2007

I’ve decided to make the Spanish part of my New Year’s Resolution (learning 15 new words per day) a little more interesting.  One of my favorite authors is Robert Jordan, and the first book in his LOOONG series is called The Eye of the World.  El Ojo del Mundo.  Thanks to a friend of mine for getting an e-copy of this book for me, so I can start reading it in Spanish.

“La Rueda del Tiempo gira, y las eras llegan y pasan y dejan de si recuerdos que se convierten en leyenda.  La leyenda se difumina, deviene mito, e incluso el mito se ha olvidado mucho antes de que la era que lo vio nacer retorne de nuevo.  En una era llamada la tercera era por algunos, una era que ha de venir, una era transcurrida hace mucho, comenzo’ a soplar un viento en las Montan~as de la Niebla.  El viento no fue el inicio, pues no existen comienzos ni finales en el eterno girar de la Rueda del Tiempo.  Pero aquel fue un inicio.”

And so it begins, the epic adventures of my dear friends.  Robert Jordan has a way with prose, that by the time I get through this book, I will probably have a vocabulary larger than many Spanish speakers.  But I’ll be reading one of my favorites along the way, so hopefully the vocabulary and size of the book will not be too daunting!

By the way – if anyone can get me an e-copy of this in any other language, I will learn that language just to be able to read this book in more than one tongue!

Thoughts on Lithuanian and Japanese

January 2, 2007

After some thought, and alot of playing around with languages and setting myself up for success yesterday, I have decided to put my “vocabulary list” with Lithuanian on hold for the time being.

I was getting materials set up yesterday so I would not have to actively look for vocabulary lists in my target languages (textbooks, vocabulary list books, websites, etc), and it dawned on me that I do not know enough about the Lithuanian language – more specifically about the alphabet and how the writing is pronounced – that I should be learning words yet.  (Kind of the “doh” factor, you know?)

In any case, I’ve decided to put the Lithuanian list on hold for now, until I have time to work my way through the pronunciation section of my “Colloquial Lithuanian” book and the corresponding audio, and I have a firmer grasp on the sound of the language.  I will probably make audio files of the material I have from Transparant Language (101 World Languages), and listen to those, and Pimsleur, when I’m at work.  This will enable me to get more comfortable with the sounds of the language.

I also am thinking it would be wiser not to set myself up the same way with Japanese.  I am currently working with the hiragana and katakana syllabaries, and I think my Japanese time will be focused more on that.  I will continue with Pimsleur and Rosetta Stone, however, and I’m sure I’ll be picking up limited vocabulary from those.